Martha Tedeschi Appointed Director of the Harvard Art Museums

Harvard University announced on Wednesday March 9, that Martha Tedeschi has been named the Elizabeth and John Moors Cabot Director of the Harvard Art Museums, effective July 2016. Tedeschi is currently the deputy director for art and research at the Art Institute of Chicago. Tedeschi replaces Thomas W. Lentz, who left his  director post in…

The Nave Gallery and Gallery 263 Launch Fundraising Campaigns in March

The Nave Galleries in Somerville and Gallery 263 in Cambridge recently launched fundraising campaigns this month to help pay for their programming and related costs. These two galleries—both non-commercial and non-profit spaces—are crucial for emerging artists and curators to show work in an area lacking in alternative art spaces. Located outside the City of Boston,…

The Fruitlands Museum to Merge with The Trustees of Reservations 

  The Fruitlands Museum in Harvard, Massachusetts announced on February 18, that it plans to merge with The Trustees of Reservations—the state’s largest conservation and preservation nonprofit founded in 1891. The Fruitlands Museum which was founded in 1914 by author and preservationist Clara Endicott Sears, takes its name from a failed experimental utopian community once located on…

On Sketchbooks and The Sketchbook Show at the Nave Gallery

I love sketchbooks. As a tool readily available to anyone, sketchbooks are important in documenting the growth and development of an artist; they allow for experimentation and exploration of ideas that may or may not produce a completed or more meaningful work later on. Sketchbooks are the subject of an exhibit at the Nave Galley…

Shattering Stereotypes at the Peabody Essex Museum’s Native Fashion Now Exhibit

The Peabody Essex Museum is no stranger to mounting thought provoking exhibitions on Native American Art. Thanks in part to its favorable location in Salem and to the elite members of the East India Marine Society—the Peabody Essex’s founding institution—who began amassing much of the museum’s 20,000 works made by Native Americans, the museum is…

Calling it “Heroic,” Boston Moves Forward to Re-Imagine Its City Hall

Oh, the times they are a-changin’ in Boston. It was just in September 2013 when then Representative Martin J. Walsh, announced a proposal to sell City Hall Plaza to a private developer and privatize the building—paving the way for the bulldozing of the plaza and possibly City Hall. “You could put a hotel boutique here….

Roxbury Artist Ekua Holmes Wins Prestigious Caldecott Honor Book Medal

The medal was awarded for illustrating children’s book on Civil Rights Movement leader Fannie Lou Hamer. If the name Ekua Holmes sounds familiar, then you may remember last year’s Martin Luther King Day Google Doodle. That Doodle was the work of Ms. Holmes, a painter and collage artist residing in Boston’s Roxbury neighborhood. Ms. Holmes…

At The Gardner Museum, Rachel Perry Asks, “What Do You Really Want?”

   Image Credit: Artist Rendering, Photo (c) Clements, 2015. Need a New Oxygen Concentrator. That was the subject line of a spam email I received earlier this week. The spam annoyed me more than it usually does because it appeared in my inbox, bypassing my junk email folder altogether. Currently on view at the Gardner…

New Project: An Exhibit on Printmaking at the Cambridge Center

Months before I left my position at The Cambridge Center for Adult Education, I agreed to organize a small show of works by the Center’s printmaking faculty. The show, Push/Pull: Recent Work from Printmaking Faculty will be on view January 11 – March 11, 2016 at 42 Brattle Street in Harvard Square. The exhibit features six artists who live and…

Drawn Towards Arts: An Interview with Printmaker Janet Burns Campbell

Originally from Brooklyn, NY, Janet Burns Campbell holds a bachelor’s degree in History and Literature from Reed College in Portland, Oregon and a master’s degree in English Literature from Tufts University. A painter and a printmaker, Janet has exhibited her work at the Somerville Public Library, The Hills School in Belmont, MA, the Cambridge Art Association…

Mayor Marty Walsh Proclaims November 20 ‘Corita Kent Day’

  On Friday November 20, 2015, Boston Mayor Marty Walsh proclaimed November 20 as “Corita Kent Day” in the City of Boston. Corita Kent, the artist, Catholic nun, teacher and social and political activist inspired by Andy Warhol is the subject of two exhibitions at Harvard University—Corita Kent and the Language of Pop at the…

From Prints to Film Stills: An Interview with SMFA Alumni Vinicius Sanchez

Vinicius Sanchez, a 2011 graduate of the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, is an artist who merges silkscreen and woodcut prints with film, video and animation. While a student in the Print + Paper area at the Museum School, Vinicius experimented with a variety of media, including animation, film and music production. His work has been…

Book Review: Japanese Woodblock Print Workshop by April Vollmer

Japanese woodblock printmaking or mokuhanga—moku meaning “wood” and hanga “printmaking”—is the subject of a new book by New York artist April Vollmer. Published by Watson-Guptill, Japanese Woodblock Print Workshop: A Modern Guide to the Ancient Art of Mokuhanga, re-introduces to an American (mostly) audience the beauty, history and significance of mokuhanga alongside step-by-step instructions for…

Book Review: Seven Spoons

“A Blogger Gets a Book Deal and Publishes a Cookbook. The Results Are Not What You Might Have Expected.” This could have been the click-bait title of this post, but the book does not deserve such title or such treatment. Seven Spoons by the Toronto-based food blogger Tara O’Brady, is the latest blog-cum-cookbook to have landed…

Observations: On the #SneakerCulture Exhibit at the Brooklyn Museum

Contrary to popular belief, I don’t consider myself a sneakerhead. I don’t collect, have boxes of unworn kicks in a basement or resell my sneakers. I also don’t camp out and stand in line for hours hoping to get my hands on limited, rare and exclusive sneakers. I do possess some knowledge of sneakers and wear those that…

Glassblowing Weekend: Learning How to Make My Own Drinking Glass

Soon after leaving architecture school almost eight years ago, I enrolled in a stained glass class at a local adult education program where I learned how to create small hanging panels. I modeled the work I was making in this class after the designs of Frank Lloyd Wright, since I found Wright’s geometry, lead work…

Book Review: Asian Pickles by Karen Solomon

Asian Pickles: Sweet, Sour, Salty, Cured and Fermented Preserves by Karen Solomon is one of the most exquisite condiment and preserving books on the market today. A product (and reflection) of Solomon’s many travels throughout Asia, this book is organized into five geographic areas: Japan, Korea, China, India and Southeast Asia. It features among many other…

Ramen – It’s What Dreams Are Made Of

I’ve become quite the ramen connoisseur (read: snob). A good friend of mine from high school recently introduced me to the culture of ramen in Boston. I’ve never had “real” ramen other than the instant kind I used to eat as a penniless college kid in New Hampshire. I was eager to indulge in and…

Instagramming Brutalism

This morning while riding the Green Line to work I overheard a conversation between two men commenting on the state of architecture in Boston. The men started discussing the current cold weather snap in the northeast and how when they were younger, schools never used to close. I wasn’t completely focused on the conversation and…

Photographs with a View of Her Own

For those of us with an interest in Boston’s Gilded Age, the Women’s Suffrage Movement or 19th century female photographers, the name Clover Adams rings a bell. Marian “Clover” Hooper Adams—Gilded Age socialite and portrait photographer, is currently the subject of a small but delightful exhibition at the Massachusetts Historical Society.   A Gilded and…