What I Saw: The Royall House and Slave Quarters in Medford, MA

When we hear about slavery, the Southern American states or the sugar cane plantations in the Caribbean are what come to mind, but slavery also was very much an institution in New England. Among the New England states with the largest populations of enslaved Africans included Rhode Island, Connecticut and Massachusetts. I recently went on…

From Diana to Pinhole Cameras at The Somerville Toy Camera Festival

  As the saying goes, it’s not the camera you use, it’s what you do with it that matters. At the Somerville Toy Camera Festival, this saying rings true again and again as the artists selected to participate in the exhibition prove that you can still make a good photograph without needing professional equipment. For…

Captured on Video: The SMFA 2016 Graduate Thesis Screening

Thesis season is upon us. On Wednesday May 4th, the School of the Museum of Fine Arts (SMFA) presented a selection of videos and films made by the school’s 2016 MFA students. Much of the work shown was exceptional, proving that an interdisciplinary approach to an art education such as that at the SMFA, produces…

Get Ready for 101 Days of Dance and Rodin Sculptures at the Peabody Essex Museum

The Peabody Essex Museum will present 101 days of modern gestural performance to accompany one of the must-see exhibitions of the summer, Rodin: Transforming Sculpture. Dancers from the BoSoma Dance Company of Peabody, Mass will respond to the sculptures by Auguste Rodin, many of which include masterpieces such as “The Thinker,” “The Kiss” and “The Hand…

Marcelo Ment Brings a Bit of Brazil’s Sunshine to Dorchester

Internationally acclaimed street artist Marcelo Ment recently spent a couple of days in Dorchester to paint a new mural along one of the neighborhood’s main streets. Ment—who generously contributed his time and talent to help Greater Ashmont Main Street’s (formerly known as St. Mark’s Area Main Street) efforts in beautifying Dorchester Avenue—just wrapped up a…

The Nave Gallery and Gallery 263 Launch Fundraising Campaigns in March

The Nave Galleries in Somerville and Gallery 263 in Cambridge recently launched fundraising campaigns this month to help pay for their programming and related costs. These two galleries—both non-commercial and non-profit spaces—are crucial for emerging artists and curators to show work in an area lacking in alternative art spaces. Located outside the City of Boston,…

On Sketchbooks and The Sketchbook Show at the Nave Gallery

I love sketchbooks. As a tool readily available to anyone, sketchbooks are important in documenting the growth and development of an artist; they allow for experimentation and exploration of ideas that may or may not produce a completed or more meaningful work later on. Sketchbooks are the subject of an exhibit at the Nave Galley…

At The Gardner Museum, Rachel Perry Asks, “What Do You Really Want?”

   Image Credit: Artist Rendering, Photo (c) Clements, 2015. Need a New Oxygen Concentrator. That was the subject line of a spam email I received earlier this week. The spam annoyed me more than it usually does because it appeared in my inbox, bypassing my junk email folder altogether. Currently on view at the Gardner…

New Project: An Exhibit on Printmaking at the Cambridge Center

Months before I left my position at The Cambridge Center for Adult Education, I agreed to organize a small show of works by the Center’s printmaking faculty. The show, Push/Pull: Recent Work from Printmaking Faculty will be on view January 11 – March 11, 2016 at 42 Brattle Street in Harvard Square. The exhibit features six artists who live and…

Drawn Towards Arts: An Interview with Printmaker Janet Burns Campbell

Originally from Brooklyn, NY, Janet Burns Campbell holds a bachelor’s degree in History and Literature from Reed College in Portland, Oregon and a master’s degree in English Literature from Tufts University. A painter and a printmaker, Janet has exhibited her work at the Somerville Public Library, The Hills School in Belmont, MA, the Cambridge Art Association…

Mayor Marty Walsh Proclaims November 20 ‘Corita Kent Day’

  On Friday November 20, 2015, Boston Mayor Marty Walsh proclaimed November 20 as “Corita Kent Day” in the City of Boston. Corita Kent, the artist, Catholic nun, teacher and social and political activist inspired by Andy Warhol is the subject of two exhibitions at Harvard University—Corita Kent and the Language of Pop at the…

From Prints to Film Stills: An Interview with SMFA Alumni Vinicius Sanchez

Vinicius Sanchez, a 2011 graduate of the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, is an artist who merges silkscreen and woodcut prints with film, video and animation. While a student in the Print + Paper area at the Museum School, Vinicius experimented with a variety of media, including animation, film and music production. His work has been…

Eso Eres / Marea

My introduction to the work of Rafael Rondeau and Maria Rondeau occurred last summer in Close Distance—a terrific group exhibition highlighting six emerging Boston-area Latino artists. That summer at the Mills Gallery, we saw videos that explored architecture and its ability to frame our experience of place. Once again, this brother and sister duo have…

Nancy Holt on Nancy Holt

A pioneer in the Land Art movement (and art world hero of mine), Nancy Holt is the subject of a retrospective at the Tufts University Art Gallery which opened on January 19th. A Worcester, Massachusetts native and Tufts graduate (Class of 1960), for the past forty-five years, Holt has created land and site-specific sculptures that…

I Love These Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A. Videos

(If you are an email subscriber, you may need to head over to the actual blog to check out these wonderful videos) Everyone on the Internets is loving these amazing videos part of the advertising campaign for the Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A 1945-1980 exhibition. Everyone knows that The Evolving Critic is a Boston-centric…

One Gallery I Bet You Didn’t Even Know Existed in Boston

Sprawling over the grounds and docks of an active shipyard on Marginal Street in East Boston are thirty contemporary artworks by established and emerging artists from three continents. The Shipyard Gallery, an initiative of Harbor Arts, a collaborative community organization “whose sole purpose is to protect and preserve our oceans and waterways by helping each…

In Retrospect…

I do not write about every show I see, but I do tweet about them (@evolvingcritic). This summer I have seen some outstanding and some not so outstanding shows, here I go: Cocktail Culture: Ritual and Invention in American Culture, 1920-1980 at the Museum of Art at the Rhode Island School of Design was one…

It’s a Mad, Mad, World: Fashion Advertisements from the 1950′s

In the last installment of this series, you saw liquor advertisements taken out of 1950’s New Yorker Magazines.  I went back to the Brattle Bookshop and bought 15 more 1950’s New Yorker Magazines (1953 through 1955, in the last post, the images were taken out of 1956 through 1959 New Yorker Magazines). I have found more liquor…

It’s a Mad, Mad, World: Liquor Advertisements from the 1950’s

Last week I stumbled upon a sale of vintage New Yorker magazines at the Brattle Book Shop on West Street in Downtown Crossing. Intrigued by the advertisements, I purchased 20 random issues from the 1950’s with the goal of scanning some of its pages and using the advertisements for future blog posts. Given the popularity…

The Writings on the Walls

I am fascinated with every aspect of a city. The fabric of a city, its many complex layers and patterns tell colorful and sometimes dark stories that deeply interest me. The city for me is my sanctuary for meditation, and because mediation is an internal personal practice, I rely on external factors like my camera…

Jennifer Steinkamp will make you smile

Have you ever gone to a museum or gallery and seen a work that just made you smile? I recently went to see a show that did just that, in fact, I was even smiling at strangers on the subway….in Boston (this never happens, EVER)! Astatic|February 1 – March 05, 2011| Bakalar and Paine Gallery|MassArt…

How to Build an Igloo

This winter we have more snow on the ground than we could possibly know what to do with it. The bad news is that it is only February, so I’m sure more snow is on the way. With all this snow, and more on the way, I think we can all prepare ourselves by watching this short documentary on how to make…

A New Year, A New Boston

Here’s to a new year, a new Boston! More than two decades in the making, the Paramount Theatre is breathing new life today thanks to dedicated organizations like the Boston Preservation Alliance, institutions like Emerson College, the  Boston Landmarks Commission and Bostonians whose vision aided in the revitalization of many of the theatres on Washington…

A Fascination with the Toxic

Growing up in a tiny rural town on the southern coast of the Dominican Republic, meant that I was always surrounded by trees, shrubs and flowers.  I grew up with my feet firmly planted on the ground (literally) anxiously looking after our banana, lime, pomegranate, cherry, guava and coconut trees. Flowers like hibiscus, passion flowers,…

Women without Men

  “What are you doing here? I didn’t know you knew of her work!” “Who doesn’t know of her work? She’s a big deal.” I had this brief exchange of words with an acquaintance I had not seen in a very long time in a crowded auditorium at the Graduate School of Design at Harvard…

Reflections on Water

I can’t swim to save my life. As a matter of fact, I can’t even doggy paddle. I thought I’d tell you now before you read any further. I must also tell you that I’ve never experienced any life altering incidents involving water (in case you wanted to know). In fact, some of the fondest…