Pipeline at the Central Square Theater

Dominique Morriseau’s Pipeline exposes the nuances of growing up as a black boy in a society that constantly crushes dreams and doubts their self-worth. The play makes it clear that our educational system not only upholds, but continues to enforce white supremacist ideals. “Half of these damn kids are suffering from mental illness,” exclaims Laurie (Barbara Douglass)…

What I Saw: In Mexico City, Concrete Architecture and Then Some

Feeling energized and inspired from the charm and beauty of Guadalajara, I continued on to the last leg of my trip: Mexico City. The largest city in North America with a population of 21.3 million people, Mexico City is a financial and cultural powerhouse in Latin America. Visiting this incredible city was nothing like I…

What I Saw: Guadalajara and Everything In-Between

After wrapping up the residency, I decided to spend time exploring the vibrant and cosmopolitan city of Guadalajara and the nearby colorful and picturesque town of Tlaquepaque (pronounced (Tla-Keh-Pa-Keh).  Not to be confused with the replica town of Tlaquepaque in Sedona, Arizona, Tlaquepaque is only a twenty-minute cab ride from nearby Guadalajara and a must-see destination…

Adventures in Jalisco, Mexico: Site + Cycle and Filmmaking

It has been a little over a month since I got back from an incredible, three-week trip to Mexico, yet the smells, sights and sounds of the Mexican landscapes are still fresh on my mind. It all started in December 2017 when I stumbled upon an opportunity I couldn’t refuse—the chance of spending two weeks…

What I Saw: Frank Lloyd Wright in Buffalo, NY

“This book is intended to make it impossible, ever again, for anyone who cares about architecture to say, ‘We drove by Buffalo on the Thruway, but decided not to stop because there’s nothing there to look at—is there?’”[1] opens the architecture critic Reyner Banham in his dedication and introduction to Buffalo Architecture: A Guide. “Anybody…

What I Saw: Frank Lloyd Wright in River Forest, IL

To read the first part of my Frank Lloyd Wright summer adventure, click here. Shortly after checking off all the Frank Lloyd Wright buildings from my list of buildings to see in Oak Park, I hopped on the “El” and met The Urbanologist in Lincoln Park, Chicago where we toured the campus of DePaul University….

What I Saw: Frank Lloyd Wright in Chicago and Oak Park, Illinois

As you may have recalled from my previous post on my summer architecture-peeping trip celebrating the 150th birthday of Frank Lloyd Wright, the first stop on this multi-city adventure was Chicago. Renown for its excellent architecture, public art and museums, Chicago not only witnessed the development of the skyscraper as a work of art, but…

What I Saw: The Royall House and Slave Quarters in Medford, MA

When we hear about slavery, the Southern American states or the sugar cane plantations in the Caribbean are what come to mind, but slavery also was very much an institution in New England. Among the New England states with the largest populations of enslaved Africans included Rhode Island, Connecticut and Massachusetts. I recently went on…

Falling in Love with Buffalo, All Over Again

Is it possible to fall in love with a city more than you already are? The City of Buffalo, New York had been on my mind constantly for the past few years, but even more so after reading Alexandra Lange’s essay “A Buffalo Case Study: Can Architecture Bring a City Back?” Years ago, when I was…

Brutalist Crush: Explore Boston’s Concrete Architecture with this New Map

The Brutalist Boston Map everyone has been waiting for, is finally here. And by “everyone,” I mean those with even the slightest interest in the concrete architecture of the sixties and seventies in Boston. Written and edited by Mark Pasnik, Chris Grimley and Michael Kubo—the authors behind Heroic: Concrete Architecture and the New Boston, the…

Kingston Gallery Director Named Curator at Fruitlands Museum

Former director of Kingston Gallery in Boston, Shana Dumont Garr has been named Curator at Fruitlands Museum. Prior to joining the Fruitlands Museum, Ms. Dumont Garr was the Director of Programs & Exhibitions at Artspace in Raleigh, North Carolina, the Montserrat Art Gallery in Beverly, MA; and the Hurst Gallery in Cambridge, MA. The Fruitlands…

From Diana to Pinhole Cameras at The Somerville Toy Camera Festival

  As the saying goes, it’s not the camera you use, it’s what you do with it that matters. At the Somerville Toy Camera Festival, this saying rings true again and again as the artists selected to participate in the exhibition prove that you can still make a good photograph without needing professional equipment. For…

Back to New England: Currier Museum of Art Names New Director and CEO

The Board of Trustees of the Currier Museum of Art in Manchester, New Hampshire has announced the appointment of Alan Chong as its new Director and Chief Executive Officer. An already familiar face to many in New England, Dr. Chong will be the ninth director in the Museum’s 87-year history and comes to the Currier…

Unlocking Boston: 14 Must-See Sites at This Year’s Common Boston Festival

For the first time ever, Common Boston is adopting a new format for their highly popular festival of design and architecture in the city. Kicking off on June 4 and continuing through the weekend, Common Boston will “unlock” the doors to dozens of architecturally, culturally and historically significant sites in and around Boston. Architecture and design enthusiasts…

Captured on Video: The SMFA 2016 Graduate Thesis Screening

Thesis season is upon us. On Wednesday May 4th, the School of the Museum of Fine Arts (SMFA) presented a selection of videos and films made by the school’s 2016 MFA students. Much of the work shown was exceptional, proving that an interdisciplinary approach to an art education such as that at the SMFA, produces…

Get Ready for 101 Days of Dance and Rodin Sculptures at the Peabody Essex Museum

The Peabody Essex Museum will present 101 days of modern gestural performance to accompany one of the must-see exhibitions of the summer, Rodin: Transforming Sculpture. Dancers from the BoSoma Dance Company of Peabody, Mass will respond to the sculptures by Auguste Rodin, many of which include masterpieces such as “The Thinker,” “The Kiss” and “The Hand…

Marcelo Ment Brings a Bit of Brazil’s Sunshine to Dorchester

Internationally acclaimed street artist Marcelo Ment recently spent a couple of days in Dorchester to paint a new mural along one of the neighborhood’s main streets. Ment—who generously contributed his time and talent to help Greater Ashmont Main Street’s (formerly known as St. Mark’s Area Main Street) efforts in beautifying Dorchester Avenue—just wrapped up a…

Year-End Student Film and Video Screeners: Emerson College Edition

Rarely do we ever get to read about the work of students graduating from one of the film and video programs in the Boston area. On Wednesday April 6, the Department of Visual and Media Arts at Emerson College presented its fifth annual festival of documentary films, featuring work completed by both undergraduate and graduate…

All Power to the People: Stanley Nelson at Emerson College Discusses Filmmaking, The Black Panthers and His Next Film

On Thursday April 7th—as part of their Bright Lights Film Series—Emerson College screened Emmy Award winner and MacArthur “genius” Fellow, Stanley Nelson’s latest film, The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution. Nelson’s documentary is the first feature length film “to explore the Black Panther Party, its significance to the broader American culture, its cultural and political…